symbol1links1links2links4ksymbol
symbol2
sublinks
side1
side2
side3
side 4
side5
tools image


< Games: Flashcard Games / Test-Try Games / Bingo Variations / Other Games >

 

Flashcard Games

These games can be used with any set of flashcards. Flashcards are great for teaching words and sentences, but when you are teaching the same flashcards over and over and over, they can get boring. That's why we've come up with flashcard games. Flashcards are essential for teaching the DVD lessons, and these games let students learn the flashcards while they are involved in a fun activity.

Also see test-try games. Test-try games also work with any set of flashcards, and are an important teaching tool.

Hammer Game
Who's Fastest
Minefield
Janken
Go Fish
Fish Go
Match Up


 

Hammer Game

Materials: Two squeaky hammers, and flashcards
Participants: Teacher and two students at a time

TEACHER: Lay out 8 or more flashcards on a table. Give squeaky hammers to two students who are of similar levels. Then, name off one of the flashcards: Where is the "A Apple" flashcard? Have the students race each other to try to hit that flashcard with their hammers. Name off more flashcards. After a while, let the next pair of students take a turn, until everybody gets to have a turn.

Students race each other to make the game exciting. The idea is not to keep score or to let students beat each other. Rather, you are trying to see if they can find the correct flashcard when you say the word.

Back to top

 

Who's Fastest? Game

Materials: Flashcards, and rewards (poker chips or clothes pins)
Participants: Teacher and two students at a time

TEACHER: Lay out 8 or more flashcards face up on a table. Choose two students of similar levels to go first. Point to a flashcard. Have the students race each other to say the name of the flashcard. If one student says it first, that student gets a reward (a clothes pin or poker chip). If both students say it at the same time, neither one gets a reward. If this happens, point to another flashcard until someone says it first. OR if the students are struggling, you can choose to name the flashcard yourself and give both students a reward. This helps to keep the game moving, and still gives the students repetition in the material.

Keep pointing to flashcards and let the students collect rewards. The rewards make the game exciting for the students, and motivate them to learn the flashcards well.

After a while let another pair of students go until everyone gets a turn.

Team Variations:
The game is the same, except that all the students in the class are divided in two teams. Have the teams line up in two rows. Then, have the first pair of students go (first student in each row). When one of them names the flashcard first, that student gets to put their reward in the team cup. That pair of students then moves to the back of the rows. Let each of the pairs of students have a turn (or multiple turns), and count the rewards at the end.

OR

When one of the students names the flashcards first, they get to roll a die. Then, they get to take that number of rewards OUT of a cup. (Make sure both cups have the same number of rewards). The first team to take all the rewards out of their cup wins! This variation makes the scoring a little more random, so that even if one team is a lot better either team could still win.

Back to top

 

Minefield Game

Materials: Flashcards, and open floor space
Participants: Teacher and one student at a time

TEACHER: Lay out flashcards in rows, face up, on the floor. For example, if you have 12 flashcards, lay them out in four rows of three. These flashcards are the "minefield" that the student is trying to get across.

Designate a starting point and a finishing point on the "minefield." (The starting point can be anywhere on the first row of flashcards, and the finishing point can be anywhere on the last row of flashcards). Have one student go to the starting point. Then, name a flashcard that is close enough for the student to move to. The student will then step off of the starting point and onto this flashcard. Once the student moves, name another flashcard. The student will move again. Name flashcards until the student gets to the finishing point.

If the student steps anywhere else but the flashcard you just named, the student has stepped on a mine. If you are playing with students who know the material well, you can have them go back to the beginning. If you are playing with beginners, they will make lots of mistakes and that is fine. It is better to keep the game going rather than having them go back to the beginning.

Back to top

 

Janken (Rock Paper Scissors) Game

Materials: Flashcards
Two or more students see whose team can get to the end of the path of flashcards

TEACHER: Lay out flashcards in a long path on the floor. Divide the students into two teams, and have each team line up at one end of the path of flashcards.

Signal for the students to start. One student from each team begins working their way down the row of flashcards, stepping on the flashcards one at a time and saying that flashcard aloud as they do so. Help the students as they go along if they come to flashcards they don't remember. The students are trying to go as fast as they can, and eventually they will meet somewhere in the middle.

When they meet, the students do "janken" (rock paper scissors) until one of the students wins. The student who wins the janken gets to keep his position, but the other student has to go back to the his starting point. Then, the student that won gets to move forward while naming flashcards, as does a new student from the starting point of the team that lost the "janken."

Every time students meet each other, they do "janken." Each team is trying to work their way all the way to the end of the row of flashcards. The team who works their way to the last flashcard and wins that final "janken" wins the game!

Back to top

 

Go Fish Flashcard Game

Materials: Flashcard set with two of each flashcard
Two or more students (and teacher) play each other to see who can get the most pairs

TEACHER: Deal out five to seven flashcards to each player. The first player chooses a flashcard that they have, and asks a question to another player, "Do you have the [flashcard]?" If the second player has that flashcard, then the second player answers, "Yes!", and gives it to the first player. The first player lays the pair down in front of him, and then asks another question. If the second player does not have the flashcard, then it is the next player's turn. The game continues until someone lays down all their flashcards. At this point, the players count how many pairs they have. The person with the most pairs wins.

Back to top

 

Fish Go Flashcard Game

Materials: Flashcard set with two of each flashcard
Two or more students (and teacher) play to see who can get rid of their cards first

TEACHER: This game is similar to Go Fish, but the object is to GET RID of your cards first, not to get the most pairs. Also, this game uses the sentence "Do you want... ?" instead of the sentence "Do you have... ?".

Deal out all the flashcards evenly to the players. The first player chooses one of his cards and asks another player, "Do you want [my card]" (if it is a flashcard of an apple, say "Do you want the apple?"). If the second player has the card the first player offers, he says "Yes." A pair is made, and both players get to get rid of these cards (by putting them in the middle of the table), and the first player goes again. If the second player DOESN'T have the card he is offered, he says "No," and the first player's turn is over.

The game continues until someone is able to get rid of all their cards. The first person to get rid of their cards wins.

Back to top

 

Match Up Flashcard Game

Materials: Flashcard set with two of each flashcard
Two or more students (and teacher) compete to see who can get the most matches

TEACHER: Deal all the flashcards facedown on the floor or table. The first player chooses two cards and turns them over for all to see. The player says what each flashcard is. If the two card are a match, the player takes the pair and goes again. If not, it is the next player's turn. The game ends when all the cards are gone. The player with the most pairs wins.

Back to top

 



Home - ホーム - Sitemap - Contact